UK Family Law Reform

Free information index

----- Original Message -----
From: david@ukfamilylawreform.co.uk
To: Private.Office@ofsted.gov.uk
Sent: Friday, November 15, 2013 9:40 PM
Subject: Re: Letter from Debbie Jones to David Mortimer

Dear Debbie Jones,

Thank you for your letter of 11th November 2013.

Ofsted has the responsibility of inspecting local authorities to ensure children are safe.

I should therefore be most obliged for Ofsted's position and policy regarding the failure by Councils to collect information on child abuse perpetrators.

If Ofsted does nothing about this failure by Councils such that the Councils do not know who are the child abusers then Ofsted inspections of local authorities will provide no assurance children are safe from child abuse perpetrators because such people will remain unknown to councils.

An implication of your letter is that Ofsted has not raised this somewhat fundamental matter with the Department of Education. Does Ofsted intend raising this matter with the Department of Education and if so when please might that be.

And I should be obliged for Ofsted's position on my original question which was if councils don't collect information on child abuse perpetrators how can they write policies which would effectively protect children and would you kindly ask those who don't collect this information who their policies are designed to protect children from?

Best regards Dave

----- Original Message -----
From: david@ukfamilylawreform.co.uk
To: thomas.cattermole@ofsted.gov.uk
Sent: Monday, October 21, 2013 4:49 PM
Subject: Who are their policies designed to protect children from?

Dear Thomas Cattermole,

If councils don't collect information on child abuse perpetrators how can they write policies which would effectively protect children & would you kindly ask those who don't collect this information who their policies are designed to protect children from?

Yours Sincerely

David Mortimer

----- Original Message -----
From: david@ukfamilylawreform.co.uk
To: officeofmarklancaster@parliament.uk
Sent: Monday, October 21, 2013 8:26 PM
Subject: Re: Who are their policies designed to protect children from?

Hi Mark,

This legislation was consolidated in the Children and Young Peoples Act 1933 and the Children Act 1989.

These are the national implementation of Articles 3 and 19 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

Section 1(1) of the Children and Young People Act 1933 is UN Article 19(1) Protection of Children from Violence. The sentencing guidance for the offence is UN Article 19(2) Prevention of Violence Towards Children, as cited from the recent Munro Review of Child Protection.

The state is required to provide social programmes to support families in preventing child neglect and abuse. These are specified under section 4 Part 1 Schedule 2 Children Act 1989 and include services to families under Part III (section 4(1)).

The services are provided in an integrated manner, as described in section 3 Child Care Act 2006. Provision is based on the section 1(3) Children Act 1989, the welfare checklist, and Working Together to Safeguard Children.

The services are intended to meet the the child's learning and development requirements of section 41(3) and the welfare regulations of section 43(1). This is UN Article 3, the best interests of the child following section 1 - 5 and Schedule A1 Mental Capacity Act 2005.

That is child care and protection law in the UK.

Best regards Dave

----- Original Message -----
From: david@ukfamilylawreform.co.uk
To: officeofmarklancaster@parliament.uk
Sent: Friday, October 18, 2013 7:52 PM
Subject: Re: Who are their policies designed to protect children from?

Hi Mark,

There is a single child neglect and abuse offense. The offence is child cruelty under section 1(1) Children and Young Peoples Act 1933.

This offence, in the criminal law, is exactly mirrored in the definitions of child neglect and abuse in Working Together to Safeguard Children (2013).

The offence, and the definitions in Working Together, are negligence offences. They are in respect to the negligence of the person with responsibility for the child when the child is a victim of an offence.

Under section 1(2) a state's official is expressly liable for the offence and under section 17 a person with parental responsibility or with care of the child is expressly liable.

According to a recent Parliamentary briefing memoranda there are no prosecutions explicitly in respect to sections 1(2) and 17. If this neglect and abuse data were published it would become clearly apparent to all that the UK Government has not one iota of interest in child protection.

At a more sophisticated level, prosecution of the offence is the evidential basis of evidence based health and welfare policy (see Cartwright, Nancy and Munro, Eileen (2010) The limitations of randomized controlled trials in predicting effectiveness. Journal of evaluation in clinical practice, 16 (2). pp. 260-266. ISSN 1356-1294, http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/28826/)

Professor Eileen Munro is, of course the government's child protection advisor.

Best regards Dave

----- Original Message -----
From: david@ukfamilylawreform.co.uk
To: officeofmarklancaster@parliament.uk
Sent: Wednesday, October 16, 2013 8:01 PM
Subject: Re: Who are their policies designed to protect children from?

Hi Mark,

The zenith of data accuaracy and insight was the “Family Court Reporter” sadly now defunct.

Envisaged reliance on local authorities is misplaced. If localisation is introduced resulting in local authorities being in charge of completion of deadlines, timescales, standards and are also expected to produce reliable statistics that are both compliant and compatible with other authorities the Panel will be disappointed.

The basis of this conclusion is the misplaced reliance contained in the Children Act 1989 to localise statistical data collation of child abuse and custody award. Prior to 1989 it was collected nationally in the “Family Court Reporter.” (pub’d by the Home Office). It listed the identity of perpetrators by age, by sex and by other indicators, such as relationship, including biological father versus step-fathers, marital status and socio-economic status

So comprehensive was it that it was quoted before the US congressional Sub-Committee on Crime of the House Judiciary Committee (Sept 29th 1999) by the prestigious “Heritage Foundation”.

In throwing away the Family Court Reporter as a source we throw away a national treasure – a treasure the panel now sorely needs.

Best regards Dave

----- Original Message -----
From: officeofmarklancaster@parliament.uk
To: david@ukfamilylawreform.co.uk
Sent: Wednesday, October 16, 2013 9:56 AM
Subject: RE: Who are their policies designed to protect children from?

Dear David,

Yes, that is about the size of what I am saying. However in terms of adjusting legislation to change the way data is collected, is not my speciality. However I would be more than happy to write to Minister on your behalf and forward their response to you.

Kind regards,

Mark Lancaster TD MP

Milton Keynes North

HOUSE OF COMMONS
LONDON SW1A 0AA

----- Original Message -----
From: david@ukfamilylawreform.co.uk
Sent: 15 October 2013 15:55
To: officeofmarklancaster@parliament.uk
Subject: Re: Who are their policies designed to protect children from?

Hi Mark,

Thank you very much for your reply, which I found both interesting & informative. Are you basically saying the Children's Act needs to be changed to put a duty on local authorities to collect child abuse perpetrator information & if so, can you tell me how you think it should be collected?

Best regards Dave

----- Original Message -----
From: officeofmarklancaster@parliament.uk
To: david@ukfamilylawreform.co.uk
Sent: Wednesday, October 09, 2013 11:18 AM
Subject: RE: Who are their policies designed to protect children from?

Dear David

Thank you for your email and please accept my apologies for not getting back to you sooner.

The short answer to your query is that the Children Acts (1989 and 2004) place a general duty on local authorities, among other organisations, to safeguard and promote the welfare of children but this does not include a duty to collect information about the abusers.

Information about sexual and violent offenders is kept by the police, probation and prison services and may be shared with other agencies including local social services, housing and education authorities.

The House of Commons Library Home Affairs Section has provided the following regarding the Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements Guidance and the sex offenders register:

The MAPPA (Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements) Guidance, 2012 requires the local criminal justice agencies and other bodies dealing with certain offenders to work together in partnership in dealing with these offenders. There a summary of MAPPA on page 1 of the guidance and the relevant provisions of the Criminal Justice Act 2003 are set out on pages 5 & 6. Local authorities have a duty to cooperate with the responsible authority (police/probation/prison service). This can involve information sharing about child sex offenders liable to management under MAPPA. See section 3 on page 15 re local education authorities and section 6 on page 18 re social services.

The Standard Note Registration and management of sex offenders under the Sexual Offences Act 2003 may be of interest. This is about the ‘sex offenders register’ which requires certain sex offenders to notify the police of personal information. But it doesn’t look at information received by local authorities.

Local authorities do collect information about the individual circumstances of children, including their needs and dangers to them. The Social & General Statistics Section has provided the following:

Local authorities do collect information about the reasons why children are referred as being “in need” and those who are subject to a child protection plan. This includes details of whether a child is in danger of sexual, physical or emotional abuse. See for example, tables B5 and D2 in the linked excel file:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/219175/sfr27-2012v4.xls

They also publish details of the main category of need why children are taken into care. See for example Table LAC4 in this link: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/219212/sfr20-2012lav2.xls

Under the 2004 Act local authorities have a duty to share concerns about children’s welfare and safety and ensure preventative action. The Act requires each local authority to establish a Local Safeguarding Children Board (LSCB) for their area and specifies the organisations and individuals that should be represented on LSCBs. The LSCBs’ composition and duties are described in the statutory guidance, Working together to safeguard children: A guide to inter-agency working to safeguard and promote the welfare of children . This also specifies other legislation relevant to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children.

I hope this is helpful. Please contact me if you need any more information.

Kind regards,

Mark Lancaster TD MP

Milton Keynes North

HOUSE OF COMMONS
LONDON SW1A 0AA

----- Original Message -----
From: david@ukfamilylawreform.co.uk
Sent: 26 September 2013 16:00
To: officeofmarklancaster@parliament.uk

Subject: Who are their policies designed to protect children from?

Mark Lancester MP
Suite 102, Milton Keynes Business Centre
Foxhunter Drive
Milton Keynes
MK14 6GD
01908 686830
officeofmarklancaster@parliament.uk

26th September 2013.

Dear Mark Lancaster,

Please will you kindly tell me if the Children's Act places a duty on Milton Keynes council to collect child abuse perpetrator information & if you can tell me how you think it's possible for them to write policies which would effectively protect children from abuse if they do not collect this information?

Yours Sincerely

David Mortimer

----- Original Message -----
From: Jane.Spencer@Milton-Keynes.gov.uk
To: david@mortimers-removals.co.uk
Sent: Wednesday, March 20, 2013 11:50 AM
Subject: 175654 Freedom of information request

Dear Mr Mortimer

We have now provided responses to your additional questions (below) and suggest that this correspondence is now closed.

Jane Spencer

Performance Manager (Children's Social Care) / FOI Liaison Officer

Integrated Support & Social Care

Children and Families | Milton Keynes Council

http://www.milton-keynes.gov.uk/

Where we think differently, create opportunity and believe in people

----- Original Message -----
From: david@mortimers-removals.co.uk
Sent: 14 March 2013 21:30
To: Jane.Spencer@Milton-Keynes.gov.uk
Subject: Re: 175654 Freedom of information request

Hi Jane,

I did call your office today because I need you to clarify exactly what you meant in your reply to my question which was: Please will you kindly tell me who decides' on how child abuse perpetrator information is collected?

Please find attached link to The Multi Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA) statutory guidance which includes a chapter on information sharing and disclosure.

MAPPA Guidance 2012:

http://www.justice.gov.uk/offenders/multi-agency-public-protection-arrangements

Also The Ministry of Justice Prison Service Public Protection Manual . This provides for the provision of information by the prison to relevant services including children’s social care regarding any prisoner, including on remand, who presents a risk to children. There is a standard process for sharing information which is compliant with national information sharing guidance. Information is shared on an individual basis, based on assessment of risk directly or indirectly to a child and in the best interests of the child.

http://www.justice.gov.uk/offenders/public-protection-manual

In accordance with this we receive and record the name of the person, date of birth, conviction and earliest release date and any additional information deemed pertinent by the referring agency for the purposes of child protection.

There may be information shared in relation to any child at risk as a result of domestic abuse under national Multi Agency Risk Assessment Conference

guidance (MARAC)

http://www.google.co.uk/url?q=http://www.caada.org.uk/

In your reply, you start off by talking about the Department for Education’s “Working Together to Safeguard Children guidance" & how that sets out how organisations and individuals should work together to safeguard and promote the welfare of children but that does not answer my question.

Does it state in their guidance that it is your responsibility to set the criteria on how child abuse perpetrator information is collected or do they actually set the criteria on how you have to collect information on child abuse perpetrators?

Please see above.

You then go on to say "in line with this guidance prisons provide information to the local authority about any prisoner whose home address is within its boundary, where that prisoner has been convicted of an offence against a child or vulnerable adult. If this person subsequently comes to the notice of Children’s Social Care as having a link to a family with children, appropriate action to safeguard those children will be taken".

Again, this does not answer my question. Just to be clear, my concern is about what information is collected & my question was who decides on how that information is collected?

Please see above

In your second paragraph you say "that information about children which is ascertained following a referral to CSC is recorded. Some of this information is required to be shared with the Department for Education and is held in such a way that reports can be run and submitted to DfE".

Please can you tell me exactly what information is required to be collected & who set the criteria on how that information should be collected & which statute your referring too in your reply?

Please see link to Department for Education (DfE) guidance regarding local authority statutory returns.

http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/g/ssda903%20guidance%20notes%202012-13%20v1-0.pdf

http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/c/2012-13%20cin%20census%20guide%20v1-3%20web%20version.pdf

In the last part of your second paragraph you say "Social Care is not required to submit information to any Government body about offenders, and so any information you might have about the (alleged) perpetrator of an offence against a child we are working with is recorded as free text and not in reportable format. It is for this reason that we were not able to answer the specific questions you asked".

Please can you tell me who decides on what information is recorded as free text & exactly what that means?

This refers to information recorded by social care practitioners in the course of professional assessment and planning relating to the child and family. This information is protected by The Data Protection Act but is shared with all family members unless to do so would place the child at risk..

Many thanks Dave

----- Original Message -----
From: david@mortimers-removals.co.uk
To: jane.spencer@milton-keynes.gov.uk
Sent: Thursday, March 14, 2013 9:30 PM
Subject: Re: 175654 Freedom of information request

Hi Jane,

I did call your office today because I need you to clarify exactly what you meant in your reply to my question which was: Please will you kindly tell me who decides' on how child abuse perpetrator information is collected?

In your reply, you start off by talking about the Department for Education’s “Working Together to Safeguard Children guidance" & how that sets out how organisations and individuals should work together to safeguard and promote the welfare of children but that does not answer my question.

Does it state in their guidance that it is your responsibility to set the criteria on how child abuse perpetrator information is collected or do they actually set the criteria on how you have to collect information on child abuse perpetrators?

You then go on to say "in line with this guidance prisons provide information to the local authority about any prisoner whose home address is within its boundary, where that prisoner has been convicted of an offence against a child or vulnerable adult. If this person subsequently comes to the notice of Children’s Social Care as having a link to a family with children, appropriate action to safeguard those children will be taken".

Again, this does not answer my question. Just to be clear, my concern is about what information is collected & my question was who decides on how that information is collected?

In your second paragraph you say "that information about children which is ascertained following a referral to CSC is recorded. Some of this information is required to be shared with the Department for Education and is held in such a way that reports can be run and submitted to DfE".

Please can you tell me exactly what information is required to be collected & who set the criteria on how that information should be collected & which statute your referring too in your reply?

In the last part of your second paragraph you say "Social Care is not required to submit information to any Government body about offenders, and so any information you might have about the (alleged) perpetrator of an offence against a child we are working with is recorded as free text and not in reportable format. It is for this reason that we were not able to answer the specific questions you asked".

Please can you tell me who decides on what information is recorded as free text & exactly what that means?

Many thanks Dave

----- Original Message -----
From: Jane.Spencer@Milton-Keynes.gov.uk
Sent: 14 March 2013 13:08
To: david@mortimers-removals.co.uk
Subject: 175654 Freedom of information request

Dear Mr Mortimer

The Department for Education’s “Working Together to Safeguard Children” guidance sets out how organisations and individuals should work together to safeguard and promote the welfare of children. In line with this guidance prisons provide information to the local authority about any prisoner whose home address is within its boundary, where that prisoner has been convicted of an offence against a child or vulnerable adult. If this person subsequently comes to the notice of Children’s Social Care as having a link to a family with children, appropriate action to safeguard those children will be taken.

Information about children which is ascertained following a referral to CSC is recorded. Some of this information is required to be shared with the Department for Education and is held in such a way that reports can be run and submitted to DfE. Again this is covered by statute. Social Care is not required to submit information to any Government body about offenders, and so any information we might have about the (alleged) perpetrator of an offence against a child we are working with is recorded as free text and not in reportable format. It is for this reason that we were not able to answer the specific questions you asked.

Information regarding offenders would be held by Police and Probation.

Jane Spencer

Performance Manager (Children's Social Care)

Integrated Support & Social Care

Children and Families

http://www.milton-keynes.gov.uk/

----- Original Message -----
From: david@mortimers-removals.co.uk
To: Jane.Spencer@Milton-Keynes.gov.uk
Sent: Tuesday, March 12, 2013 12:40 PM
Subject: Re: 175654 Freedom of information request

Hi Jane,

Please will you kindly tell me, who decides' on how child abuse perpetrator information is collected?

Many thanks Dave

----- Original Message -----
From: Jane.Spencer@Milton-Keynes.gov.uk
To: david@mortimers-removals.co.uk
Sent: Tuesday, March 12, 2013 10:35 AM
Subject: 175654 Freedom of information request

Dear Mr Mortimer

Your request for information has been considered and is below.

There are different ways of interpreting ‘substantiated child abuse cases’. For the purposes of responding to your email we have considered substantiated as relating to children subject to child protection plan. All of these children are deemed by the multi agency child protection conference to have suffered or to be at significant risk of suffering harm. In some instances a person (familial or otherwise) may have been charged with an offence by the Police.

These are the number at the end of February 2013 (reporting year is April to March).

A number of children are made subject to interim care orders each year (53 to the end of January 2013). This would be an indication of serious welfare concerns and might reflect a range of difficulties relating to child abuse. However, children’s records do not hold all information in reportable format and we are unable to answers some questions. Your query about familial relationships and gender falls into this category.

Additionally as our numbers are small if there had been press interest in a particular case, to provide potentially identifiable information concerning the offender could lead to the child being identified.

If you wish to amend your query we will review our response in the light of that.

Jane Spencer

Performance Manager (Children's Social Care) / FOI Liaison Officer

Integrated Support & Social Care

Children and Families

http://www.milton-keynes.gov.uk/

----- Original Message -----
From: david@mortimers-removals.co.uk
To: Sarah.Wolstenholme@education.gsi.gov.uk
Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 5:18 PM
Subject: Who are your child protection policies designed to protect children from?

Hi Sarah,

I have looked at the information which is available at the link you suggested & it does not provide me with the information that I requested. What I would like to know is who are your child protection policies designed to protect children from, if you do not collect any information on child abuse perpetrators & how is it possible for you to write policies which would effectively protect children, if you do not collect this information?

Many thanks Dave

----- Original Message -----
From: Unmonitored.ACCOUNT@education.gsi.gov.uk
To: david@mortimers-removals.co.uk
Sent: Wednesday, February 27, 2013 4:19 PM
Subject: Case Reference 2013/0009058

Dear Mr Mortimer,

Thank you for your email dated 6th February about children’s safety. I have been asked to respond on behalf of the Minister.

The Department for Education does not collect any data on the number of perpetrators of abuse. Data on offenders is collected by the Ministry of Justice, the latest annual publication can be found at the link below:
http://www.justice.gov.uk/statistics/criminal-justice/criminal-justice-statistics/criminal-justice-statistics-editions

These data have been collected since 1984 and do not include a specific breakdown of child abuse offenses. This collection is revised only when there is a change in the offences recorded, therefore to the best of our knowledge there were no specific changes to the collection following the Children Act 1989. Please contact the Ministry of Justice if you have any questions about these data at statistics.enquiries@justice.gsi.gov.uk

The Department for Education collects data on the number of children who are receiving a social care service (defined as being children in need) and on the number of children who are the subject of a child protection plan. At 31 March 2012 there were 168,270 children in need where the primary need at initial assessment was abuse or neglect. At 31 March there were 42,850 children who were the subject of a child protection plan.

These data can be found at the link below:
http://www.education.gov.uk/rsgateway/DB/SFR/s001095/index.shtml

Data on referrals and assessments began to be collected in 2001-02, therefore this collection was not altered by the Children Act 1989. Data on child protection plans has been collected since 1988-89. Following the Children Act 1989 the guidance on arrangements for the protection of children, produced in October 1991, included revisions to procedures, terminology and register categories. The Department for Health had responsibility for collecting this data until 2002-03 when the responsibility transferred to the Department for Education. The responsibility for delivering children’s social care rests within local authorities. Local authorities report information from their management information systems to the Department for Education on these activities, which is then published by the Department so that it may be used by local authorities and other agencies as well as researchers and NGOs.

The Department is committed to reducing the number of incidents of abuse and neglect. In June 2010, the Secretary of State for Education, the Right Honourable Michael Gove MP, asked Professor Eileen Munro to conduct an independent review of child protection in England. The Department is now in the process of taking forward the recommendations following Professor Munro’s review of child protection.

Recent studies by the Child Exploitation Online Protection and the Office of the Children’s Commissioner included some details of perpetrators of abuse which you may find helpful. They can be found at:

"Out of Mind, Out of Sight" - http://www.ceop.police.uk/Documents/ceopdocs/ceop_thematic_assessment_executive_summary.pdf
Child Sexual Exploitation in Gangs and Groups - http://www.childrenscommissioner.gov.uk/

Your correspondence has been allocated reference number 2013/0009058. If you need to respond to us, please visit www.education.gov.uk/contactus, and quote your reference number.

Yours sincerely,

Sarah Wolstenholme
Supporting Delivery Group
Sarah.Wolstenholme@education.gsi.gov.uk
http://www.education.gov.uk/

----- Original Message -----
From: david@mortimers-removals.co.uk
To: foia@milton-keynes.gov.uk
Sent: Wednesday, February 13, 2013 4:57 PM
Subject: Freedom of information request

Dear Milton Keynes Council,

Please accept this message as a official request for information under the freedom of information act.

Please can you tell me what the (a) gender and (b) familial relationship to the child victim was of offenders in substantiated child abuse cases in Milton Keynes for last year, broken down by (i) physical abuse, (ii) emotional abuse, (iii) sexual abuse and (iv) cases of neglect.

Yours Sincerely

David Mortimer

----- Original Message -----
From: david@mortimers-removals.co.uk
To: timpsone@parliament.uk
Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2013 1:17 PM
Subject: Questions about child abuse offenders

Dear Edward Timpson,

I represent a parents' group which has taken a great interest in children's safety for a considerable number of years. We would therefore be most grateful if you could answer on behalf of our members all of the questions listed below.

(1) Could you detail how the collection of information about child abuse offenders operated nationally before the Children Act 1989 and how it altered after that legislation?

(2) Could you detail how the DoH and the NSPCC were involved in collection of information prior to the 1989 Act and that you have always been fully aware of this situation?

(3) Could you give us your appraisal of how successful you think devolving down responsibility to local authorities for the collection of data has proven since 1991?

(4) Given that child abuse still continues and that the identity of perpetrators by age and sex and by other markers, such as marital or socio-economic status, were listed prior to the 1989 Act, (and biological father vs. step-fathers were identified by the annual Family Court Reporter), what steps are being taken to identify perpetrators today?

(5) Given the number of public inquires in recent years into horrific child abuse and deaths cases would you agree that implement the government's stated intention of reducing such incidents, the best course would be to give the NGOS the tools to do the job by identifying the culprits?

Yours Sincerely

David Mortimer

----- Original Message -----
From: Pauline.Shayler@Milton-keynes.gov.uk
To: dave.mortimer@mensaid.com
Sent: Tuesday, January 02, 2007 11:51 AM
Subject: FOI Request

Response being sent on behalf of Sally Mottram and Paul to your emails dated 10th and 12 December 2006:

Dear Mr Mortimer

Your request for information has now been considered. However this authority does not hold information of the description specified in your request.

Yours sincerely

Jane Spencer,

Freedom of Information Liaison Officer

-----Original Message-----
From: dave.mortimer@mensaid.com
Sent: 12 December 2006 13:28
To: paul.Sutton@milton-keynes.gov.uk
Subject: Child abuse perpetrators

Dear Paul Sutton,

Please will you kindly accept this message as an official request for information under the freedom of information act.

I would like to know what the (a) gender and (b) familial relationship was of offenders in substantiated child abuse cases in Milton Keynes over the last 3 years, broken down by (i) physical abuse, (ii) emotional abuse, (iii) sexual abuse and (iv) cases of neglect.

Yours sincerely
David Mortimer

----- Original Message -----
From: lynn.rees@Dyfed-Powys.pnn.police.uk
To: dave.mortimer
Sent: Wednesday, November 15, 2006 12:02 PM
Subject: "We do not collect any information on child abuse perpetrators"

Dear Mr. Mortimer,

Thank you for highlighting the attached issues. I have discussed with Mr. Grange, however, as you can appreciate, we not responsible for the collation of such statistical information. I was however, not aware of this issue and that such information was previously collated by the DoH.

I will progress this matter with key representatives in the Home Office, and believe that the issues you raise may be timely to an ongoing review. I will appraise you with any updates that I receive.

Thank you for your contact,

Lynn

Detective Inspector Lynn Rees,
Staff Officer to the Chief Constable,
ACPO Violent Crime Portfolio,
Direct Line 01267 226306.
Mobile 07966648804.

----- Original Message -----
From: dave.mortimer
Sent: 09 October 2006 12:12
To: lynn.rees@Dyfed-Powys.pnn.police.uk
Subject: "We do not collect any information on child abuse perpetrators"

Terry Grange
ACPO Lead on Child Protection
Chief Constable
Dyfed-Powys Police
Police Headquarters
PO Box 99
Carmarthen
SA31 2PF
lynn.rees@Dyfed-Powys.pnn.police.uk
http://www.dyfed-powys.police.uk/

"We do not collect any information on child abuse perpetrators"

Dear Terry Grange,

I am writing to you on behalf of Men's Aid which is a national organisation which provides help and support to male victims of domestic abuse because we believe you have the ACPO Lead on Child Protection issues.

We would like to know if you are aware that none of the child protection agencies actually state who is responsible for abusing children in the data which they publish.

We believe this information used to be collected centrally and published by the DoH and the NSPCC prior to 1991 when the responsibility was devolved down to local authority level.

We do not believe that it will ever be possible for anyone in the child protection agencies to actually write effective policies which would protect children from abuse in future if they are not told to collect this information and we would like to know if you would kindly raise this issue with them at the next opportunity.

Yours Sincerely
David Mortimer

----- Original Message -----
From: info@dfes.gsi.gov.uk
To: dave.mortimer@tiscali.co.uk
Sent: Friday, June 16, 2006 11:15 AM
Subject: Case Reference 2006/0230615

Dear Mr Mortimer

Unfortunately we do not collect any information on child abuse perpetrators, just on children.

If you are asking more generally about how we decide whether to collect particular data: a case will be put forward by the relevant policy team, which is then scrutinised internally and externally on feasibility, purpose, burden, value for money, duplication and resourcing, before either being approved or rejected.

Yours sincerely

Jill Sewell
Public Communications Unit

Your correspondence has been allocated the reference number 2006/0230615. To correspond by email with the Department for Education and Skills please contact info@dfes.gsi.gov.uk

----- Original Message -----
From: dave.mortimer@tiscali.co.uk
To: info@dfes.gsi.gov.uk
Sent: Sunday, March 19, 2006 2:11 AM
Subject: Questions about child abuse offenders

RT HON Beverley Hughes MP
Minister for Children
Young People and Families
Department for Education and Skills
Caxton House
Tothill Street
London
SW1H 9NA
info@dfes.gsi.gov.uk
http://www.dfes.gov.uk

Dear Beverley Hughes,

I represent a parents' group which has taken a great interest in children's safety for a considerable number of years. We would therefore be most grateful if you could answer on behalf of our members all of the questions listed below.

(1) Could you detail how the collection of information about child abuse offenders operated nationally before the Children Act 1989 and how it altered after that legislation?

(2) Could you detail how the DoH and the NSPCC were involved in collection of information prior to the 1989 Act and that you have always been fully aware of this situation?

(3) Could you give us your appraisal of how successful you think devolving down responsibility to local authorities for the collection of data has proven since 1991?

(4) Given that child abuse still continues and that the identity of perpetrators by age and sex and by other markers, such as marital or socio-economic status, were listed prior to the 1989 Act, (and biological father vs. step-fathers were identified by the annual Family Court Reporter), what steps are being taken to identify perpetrators today?

(5) Given the number of public inquires in recent years into horrific child abuse and deaths cases would you agree that implement the government's stated intention of reducing such incidents, the best course would be to give the NGOS the tools to do the job by identifying the culprits?

Yours Sincerely

David Mortimer

http://www.ukfamilylawreform.co.uk/abuse.htm

A change would be in the best interests of children.

http://uk.groups.yahoo.com/group/ukfamilylawreform/