UK Family Law Reform

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----- Original Message -----
From: icatt@btinternet.com
To: david@ukfamilylawreform.co.uk
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2013 5:31 PM
Subject: Re: A child has no right of access to its parent 28th October 2012

“except if this is contrary to the child’s best interests”

This makes this “right” valueless. Allegation of violence or sexual abuse (both made against me) means the judge plays safe, and cuts off the child from its father. Canadian Senator Anne C Cools also found that in Canada, a child has no right of access to its parent.

I have ridiculed this caveat “except if this is contrary to the child’s best interests” by suggesting that legislation making it compulsory for a child to attend school should have the same caveat; “except if this is contrary to the child’s best interests”. After all, children get attacked at school, and sexually abused. Try to find this same caveat in any legislation making education compulsory! Such a caveat would of course make education optional.

Ivor Catt

----- Original Message -----
From: david@ukfamilylawreform.co.uk
To: joakimidisyuri@yahoo.com.au
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2013 5:22 PM
Subject: Re: A child has no right of access to its parent 28th October 2012

Hi Yuri,

I agree with what you have said in law which is subject to what is in the child's best interest. I have forwarded what you have said onto Ivor & will only add the problem is not the law but how it's applied & ignored.

Best regards Dave

----- Original Message -----
From: joakimidisyuri@yahoo.com.au
To: david@ukfamilylawreform.co.uk
Sent: Friday, December 27, 2013 4:07 PM
Subject: A child has no right of access to its parent 28th October 2012

Hi David

The United Nations Convention on the rights of the child ratified by the UK 16 December 1991 is a Human Rights treaty that sets out the civil, political, economic, social, health and cultural rights of children.

In many jurisdictions, properly implementing the Convention requires an overhaul of child custody law.

The convention recognises a number of rights and protection for children including:

• Children have a right to know and be cared for by both parents, regardless of whether the parents are married, separated, have never married or have never lived together (article 7.1);

• Children have a right of contact, on a regular basis, with both their parents and with other people significant to their care, welfare and development, except if this is contrary to the child’s best interests (article 9.3). (i.e. the state should only fail to support the maintenance of a child’s personal relations and direct contact with a parent on a regular basis if it is demonstrably contrary to a child’s best interest)

Article 5 of the Convention also obliges signatory countries to allow parents to exercise their parental responsibilities.

Kind regards,

Yuri Joakimidis

Joint Parenting Associations

http://www.ukfamilylawreform.co.uk/sharedparenting.htm